Friday, November 21, 2008

feminism




In my religion, gender, and society class, we're always talking about feminism, but to be honest, I don't really get American feminism.  I think the Europeans got it right.  American feminism seems overly concerned with masculinity and has a sort of penis envy that, to me, seems completely counterproductive to the ideals of true feminism.  In class, we always talk about how men have historically had all the power, but I think that depends on how you define power. I don't know if its specifically because I've grown up in a post-feminism world or because of my own bias as a woman or something else entirely, but I've always felt that women inherently have a sort of power that men seem to struggle to tap into, and grace and wisdom that some men strive for that just comes naturally for us.  I hate how the idea of wanting to raise your children is seen as some sort of defeat.  I'd rather think of having children as less of a self-sacrifice and more of an honor.  If my husband ends up being the stay-at-home dad because I'm too busy with work, I think I will be a bit jealous of his "defeat" to say the least.  The "feminine" body and persona are beautiful and diverse aspects of femininity that the feminism movement seems almost ashamed of, as if they're striving for this masculine ideal of power.  Burn your bra, and put on a suit. What is that?  We're still defining ourselves against the masculine.  Why not take the masculine out of the equation completely?  Maybe I haven't studied up enough on this subject, but as of now, I love my feminism, and the power that entails.  Hell, I even enjoy the lipstick and the skirts and (God-forbid) the door-opening chivalry. Personally, I wouldn't have it any other way.

9 comments:

JGLSU said...
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JGLSU said...

At least you're honest about it.

Modern-day feminism is about screaming for equality, unless that equality actually makes things harder for women.

In a nutshell, modern-day feminism is a completely hypocritical movement, which you touched upon in your post.

Andy G said...

I'm not sure where JGLSU gets the "unless that equality actually makes things harder for women" comment from, and I know a lot of feminists that would be highly offended by it.

Feminism is only a branch of a bigger issue: equality that extends to all people regardless of gender, race, disability, or any other divisive factor. It makes sense to focus on the women's movement because women have for so long been regarded as secondary to men, even to the point where people will try to bring in science to try and validate it.

Brittany, your post brings to mind a situation, wherein a women defines herself as such to the degree she sees fit rather than taking on a radically masculine persona in protest of the idea that women aren't allowed to be masculine. It's all about personal identity.

Some people identify with males more than females, and I don't think it has to do with "penis-envy" so much as something psychological that is pre-disposed before birth. It gets confusing because we differentiate so much between genders that when someone seeks to bend the male/female line we view them as a weird tranny freak or something.

There's nothing wrong with embracing chivalry, or wearing lipstick, or being proud of your gender the same as there's nothing wrong with just being yourself regardless of what gender society tells you you should identify with.

All this coming from a straight male, go figure.

Feminism is a really interesting topic...I've got some good zines and stuff on it if you want to dig a little deeper.

Cutwolf said...
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JGLSU said...

I'm sure they would be, Andy, but the truth is often offensive.

I've yet to meet a "feminist" who wants women to be required to register for the selective service or who wants women fighting on the front lines in war.

(Of course, some women ARE fighting in front lines, but they're technically only supposed to be in support roles only; not allowed to be infantry).

Feminism in the most commonly understood sense is about equal rights but not equal burdens. Equality in areas where equality would be beneficial, but status quo in areas where equality would be detrimental.

I'm all for complete equality, but the selective equality modern-day feminists spout is bogus.

Andy G said...

Most feminists I've met would sooner commit suicide than join the army, not because they're cowardly, but because they don't agree with the way our government functions. Hell, I feel the same way as do many of my male friends.

Anyone who shares the viewpoint you're talking about cannot be a true feminist, just based on the principles and the people that have defined feminist theory.

JGLSU said...

Exactly, yet that is the prevalent viewpoint among most self-proclaimed feminists I've encountered/heard of.

I'm sure there are some pure feminists, but the modern movement in general seems quite hypocritical.

Friend said...
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Friend said...
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